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ToniaMoore
Tonia Moore asks for support & donations


By: ToniaMoore
Date: 08/04/2009



I would like to THANK those who have supported me & who have so far made donations helping me out finanacially because now I am pretty much broke and need help with getting back on my feet till I get back to work again. I'm self employed & have no one to support me so now that is my big stress. So if you're reading this and can help me out with any little bit I would be very GREATFUL!! I know times are hard right now & I'm not the only one but I really do need whatever help I can get. I wouldn't ask if it wasn't so.

Thank you everyone for all your love & support

Donations can be sent to the following mailing address (I don't have Paypal because they banned me...that's another story)

Attn: Tonia Moore

PO BOX 848

LAKEWOOD, CA 90714-0848


BELOW IS MY STORY IN DETAIL:

Tonia Moore knocked out of competition....due to Crohn's Disease & Hospitalation!!!

My friends Sony & Rob Van Dam visit me in Hospital after surgery.

Friends VisitFriends Visit"

Well I must say it's been a quite an experience the last 3 months or so. Around April 2009 is about the last time I've been in the gym and that was probably only 2 times that month. It seems that after applying for health insurance in April and it went into effect on May 1st is when I got hit with a ton of bricks. I started having major abdominal pain, constant diarrhea where I pretty much just could not leave the house, blood in my stool, mouth full of ulcers that prevented me from eating because it hurt so bad to put anything in my mouth, then a staph infection, and a cyst in a not so nice spot. Constant trips to the doctor. I then had a Colonoscopy and an upper Endoscopy done on June 12, 2009 that diagnosed me with Crohn's Disease an (IBD) Inflammatory Bowel Disease that is not curable. My GI Specialist immediately started me on meds one of which is EXPENSIVE!!

Starting my med treatment of course takes time to kick in and I did have some days where I felt they were starting to kick in finally and not feeling the abdominal so much. I still battled with the diarrhea. I got lucky most days that I was able to at least train my clients in the morning....I always prayed for just those few hours that I would make it through and be ok till I got back home. Somewhere along the way I started feeling worse. Then on July 6, 2009 the excruciating pain I had was unbearable and decided it was time to go to ER.

Going to the ER.....well while in the bathroom literally crying from the pain I felt I then thought it's possible that I may have appendicitis since everything else hit me. I got a hold of my Mom & Sister to let them know I need to go to the ER so they came right away to get me and take me in. Luckily there was not a lot of people in the ER but it still took a while to admit me. Finally I get in ER, get a bed, they take blood, then schedule me right away for a CT Scan so I had to drink about 2 10oz cup fulls of Contrast 1 at that moment they brought it to me and the other an hour later which is not the best tasting drinking but it was cold so it made it a little more tolerable. The lab test showed my White Blood cell count very high which means major infection and my CT Scan showed that my colon perforated and waste leaked into my abdomen causing the major infection. The Doctors don't know how I even made it that far....they said "any normal person would not have made it and should've been in the hospital a couple of days ago"If I would've have waited one more day it would've killed me. After that they admitted me into a room, of course hooked up to the IV and stuff.....I needed after being so malnutritioned from really not being able to eat. I also had my moriphine where I pushed that little button every 1o minutes to help with the pain. I mostly had to mentally get my mind into another zone till the pain would kind of go away except for any time I had to move the pain kicked in like a mother. It felt like someone stabbing me with a knife.

The next morning July 7, 2009 is when I went into surgery. When they moved my bed down to the surgery room the pain kicked in sooooo bad once that bed stopped. So my surgery....well they cut down the middle of my stomach, remove 1/3rd of my colon on the right side that had all the ulcers from the Crohn's Disease and in which had perforated, they also removed 600cc's of pus or waste from my abdominal cavity and they had to rinse and clean it all out. I stayed forever in Recovery because they had to wait for a bed in ICU for me.

Soooo I stayed 1 week in that hospital and they moved me to an extended stay rehab hospital where I pretty much was the youngest person there. They had to make sure my white blood cell count went down back to normal and be clear of the infection. It wasn't until yesterday July 23, 2009 that I finally got discharged.

Time for Recovery now....I've lost soooo much weight and muscle it's not even funny. Crohn's disease effects the absorbtion of nutrients not to mention being laid up in a hospital for 2 1/2 weeks doesn't help. I went from my muscle frame of 150lbs to a super skinny bony 98lbs. I can't wait to get back up in weight and strength.

So that's my story which has effected my life seriously in all ways. I just want to thank God, and my Mom, Sister, and my friends for all their help and support and for visiting me in the hospital. My Mom & Sister Regina has helped me out MAJORLY!!

Thanks everyone for your time, love and support.

God Bless!!

Tonia Moore

Official Website:

JeffBehar

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About the Author

Jeff Behar
Jeff Behar, MS, MBA

Jeff Behar, MS, MBA is a recognized health, fitness and nutrition expert, regularly writing about hot topics in the areas of health, fitness, disease prevention, weight loss, nutrition, anti aging and alternative medicine. Jeff Behar's work also often appears in several of the major health and fitness newsletters, health and fitness magazines, and on major health, fitness and weight loss websites. Jeff Behar is also the CEO of MuscleMagFitness.com, and MyBestHealthPortal.com; two very popular health, fitness, nutrition and anti aging information sites.


JeffBehar

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People who have lost brain cells in the hippocampus area of the brain arewoman with alzheimers more likely to develop dementia, according to a study published in the March 17, 2009, print issue of NeurologyҮ, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study involved 64 people with Alzheimer's disease, 44 people with mild cognitive impairment, which is the stage of memory problems that precedes Alzheimer's disease, and 34 people with no memory or thinking
problems.

MRI scans were performed on all of the participants at the beginning of the study and again an average of a year and a half later. During that time, 23 of the people with mild cognitive impairment had developed Alzheimer's disease, along with three of the healthy participants.

The researchers measured the volume of the whole brain and the hippocampus area, which is affected by Alzheimer's disease, at the beginning and end of the study, and calculated the rate of shrinkage in the brain over that time.

For the people who did not have dementia at the beginning of the study, those with smaller hippocampal volumes and higher rates of shrinkage were two to four times as likely to develop dementia as those with larger volumes and a slower rate of atrophy.

This finding seems to reflect that at the stage of mild cognitive impairment, considerable atrophy has already occurred in the hippocampus," said study author Wouter Henneman, MD, of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. "In people who already have Alzheimer's disease, the loss of nerve cells is more widespread throughout the brain."

About Dementia

Dementia is a progressive brain dysfunction (in Latin 'dementia' means irrationality), which results in a restriction of daily activities and in most cases leads in the long term to the need for care. Many chronic diseases can result in dementia, the most common one being Alzheimer's disease.

The probability of suffering from dementia increases with advancing age. Dementia predominantly occurs in the second half of our life, often after the age of 65. The frequency of dementia increases with rising age from less than 2 % for the 65-69-year-olds, to 5 % for the 75-79 year-olds and to more than 20 % for the 85-89 year-olds. Every third person over 90 years of age suffers from moderate or severe dementia (Bickel, Psycho 1996, 4-8). About half of those affected by dementia suffer from Alzheimer's disease.

About Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressive disease of the brain that is characterized by impairment of memory and eventually by disturbances in reasoning, planning, language, and perception. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, which afflicts 24 million people worldwide. Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging and is not something that inevitably happens in later life. It is rarely seen before the age of 65. The likelihood of having Alzheimer's disease increases substantially after the age of 70 and may affect around 50% of persons over the age of 85.

About the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 21,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, restless legs syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, narcolepsy, and stroke.

JeffBehar

People who have lost brain cells in the hippocampus area of the brain arewoman with alzheimers more likely to develop dementia, according to a study published in the March 17, 2009, print issue of NeurologyҮ, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The study involved 64 people with Alzheimer's disease, 44 people with mild cognitive impairment, which is the stage of memory problems that precedes Alzheimer's disease, and 34 people with no memory or thinking
problems.

MRI scans were performed on all of the participants at the beginning of the study and again an average of a year and a half later. During that time, 23 of the people with mild cognitive impairment had developed Alzheimer's disease, along with three of the healthy participants.

The researchers measured the volume of the whole brain and the hippocampus area, which is affected by Alzheimer's disease, at the beginning and end of the study, and calculated the rate of shrinkage in the brain over that time.

For the people who did not have dementia at the beginning of the study, those with smaller hippocampal volumes and higher rates of shrinkage were two to four times as likely to develop dementia as those with larger volumes and a slower rate of atrophy.

This finding seems to reflect that at the stage of mild cognitive impairment, considerable atrophy has already occurred in the hippocampus," said study author Wouter Henneman, MD, of VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. "In people who already have Alzheimer's disease, the loss of nerve cells is more widespread throughout the brain."

About Dementia

Dementia is a progressive brain dysfunction (in Latin 'dementia' means irrationality), which results in a restriction of daily activities and in most cases leads in the long term to the need for care. Many chronic diseases can result in dementia, the most common one being Alzheimer's disease.

The probability of suffering from dementia increases with advancing age. Dementia predominantly occurs in the second half of our life, often after the age of 65. The frequency of dementia increases with rising age from less than 2 % for the 65-69-year-olds, to 5 % for the 75-79 year-olds and to more than 20 % for the 85-89 year-olds. Every third person over 90 years of age suffers from moderate or severe dementia (Bickel, Psycho 1996, 4-8). About half of those affected by dementia suffer from Alzheimer's disease.

About Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a slowly progressive disease of the brain that is characterized by impairment of memory and eventually by disturbances in reasoning, planning, language, and perception. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, which afflicts 24 million people worldwide. Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging and is not something that inevitably happens in later life. It is rarely seen before the age of 65. The likelihood of having Alzheimer's disease increases substantially after the age of 70 and may affect around 50% of persons over the age of 85.

About the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 21,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, restless legs syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, narcolepsy, and stroke.